Jackson Bound

When talking with returned volunteers before I decided to apply for the Peace Corps, one thing they all had in common in their time overseas was their mass amounts of downtime.  Many of them did a lot of reading in their two years and this was a big appeal to me.

I plan on doing good things for Thailand, the United States and myself while I’m here, but when I have the time, I’ll be reading.  Here’s what I’ve conquered.

2013
January
164 – Easy Riders, Raging Bulls by Peter Biskind (reread)
165 – The Plague by Albert Camus
166 – An Artist in a Floating World by Kazuo Ishiguro
167 – The Third Reich at War by Richard Evans
168 – White Nights by Fyodor Dostoevsky
169 – Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
170 – Factotum by Charles Bukowski

February
171 – A Hologram for the King by Dave Eggers
172 – The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein
173 – Manhunt by James L. Swanson
174 – What Men Live By and Other Tales by Leo Tolstoy

March
175 – I Married a Communist by Philip Roth (reread)
176 – Francona: The Red Sox Years by Dan Shaughnessy

2012
January
1 (80 total) – The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
2 (81) – Netherland by Joseph O’Neill
3 (82) – Sabbath’s Theater by Philip Roth
4 (83) – The Finkler Question by Howard Jacobson
5 (84) – Everyman by Philip Roth (reread)
6 (85) – The Dying Animal by Philip Roth

February
7 (86) – Sandy Koufax: A Lefty’s Legacy by Jane Leavy (reread)
8 (87) – Portnoy’s Complaint by Philip Roth (reread)
9 (88) – Christine Falls by Benjamin Black
10 (89) – The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Minnesota Twins by Steve Aschburner
11 (90) – One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey
12 (91) – The Crossing by Cormac McCarthy
13 (92) – When We Were Orphans by Kazuo Ishiguro
14 (93) – Baseball Between the Numbers: Why Everything You Know About the Game is Wrong by Jonah Keri and Baseball Prospectus
15 (94) – Blink by Malcolm Gladwell

March
16 (95) – JFK by L.Fletcher Prouty
17 (96) – Cities of the Plain by Cormac McCarthy
18 (97) – Exit Ghost by Philip Roth (reread)
19 (98) – Rabbit is Rich by John Updike
20 (99) – Summer of 68: The Season That Changed Baseball – and America – Forever by Tim Wendel
21 (100) – Tales of Ordinary Madness by Charles Bukowski

April
22 (101) – House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
23 (102) – The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon
24 (103) – Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream by Dr. Hunter S. Thompson (reread)
25 (104) – The Orchard Keeper by Cormac McCarthy
26 (105) – Zuckerman Unbound by Philip Roth (reread)
27 (106) – The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (reread)
28 (107) – Journey to the End of the Night by Louis-Ferdinand Celine

May
29 (108) – Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier
30 (109) – The Lost Continent by Bill Bryson (reread)
31 (110) – From Russia With Love by Ian Fleming
32 (111) – In Between the Ears by Lee Goettl
33 (112) – Casino Royale by Ian Fleming
34 (113) – What is the What by Dave Eggers
35 (114) – A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
36 (115) – The Broom of the System by David Foster Wallace
37 (116) – The Man With the Golden Gun by Ian Fleming

June
38 (117) – The Anatomy Lesson by Philip Roth (reread)
39 (118) – Goodbye, Columbus by Philip Roth (reread)
40 (119) – The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway (reread)
41 (120) – The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
42 (121) – A Pale View of Hills by Kazuo Ishiguro
43 (122) – Women by Charles Bukowski
44 (123) – The Counterlife by Philip Roth

July
45 (124) – Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk (reread)
46 (125) – Amsterdam by Ian McEwan
47 (126) – Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert (reread)
48 (127) – The Complete Polysyllabic Spree by Nick Hornby
49 (128) – Outer Dark by Cormac McCarthy
50 (129) – The End of the Affair by Graham Greene
51 (130) – Suttree by Cormac McCarthy
52 (131) – Mother Night by Kurt Vonnegut (reread)
53 (132) – The Prague Orgy by Philip Roth (reread)
54 (133) – The Innocent by Ian McEwan
55 (134) – The Comfort of Strangers by Ian McEwan

August
56 (135) – Solar by Ian McEwan
57 (136) – In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson
58 (137) – White Noise by Don DeLillo
59 (138) – The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron by Howard Bryant
60 (139) – The Sunset Limited by Cormac McCarthy
61 (140) – White Teeth by Zadie Smith
62 (141) – American Pastoral by Philip Roth (reread)

September
63 (142) – The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene
64 (143) – What I Talk About When I Talk About Running by Haruki Murakami
65 (144) – Indignation by Philip Roth (reread)
66 (145) – Brief Interviews With Hideous Men by David Foster Wallace
67 (146) – Have Glove, Will Travel by Bill Lee
68 (147) – Deception by Philip Roth
69 (148) – Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami
70 (149) – Atonement by Ian McEwan

October
71 (150) – Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
72 (151) – Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance and the Rise of Independent Film by Peter Biskind
73 (152) – Founding Brothers by Joseph J. Ellis
74 (153) – The Coming of the Third Reich by Richard Evans
75 (154) – After Dark by Haruki Murakami

November
76 (155) – Villa Incognito by Tom Robbins
77 (156) – The Quiet American by Graham Greene
78 (157) – Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon
79 (158) – Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan

December
80 (159) – The Third Reich in Power by Richard Evans
81 (160) – Travels With My Aunt by Graham Greene
82 (161) – The Elementary Particles by Michel Houellebecq
83 (162) – The Berlin Wall by Frederick Taylor
84 (163) – Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin

2011
January

1 – Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro
2 – I Married a Communist by Philip Roth
3 – The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

February
4 – How We Are Hungry by Dave Eggers
5 – Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins
6 – Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

March
7 – The Game From Where I Stand by Doug Glanville
8 – A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Bad Beginning by Lemony Snicket
9 – No Country For Old Men (reread) by Cormac McCarthy
10 – Incredibly Close and Extremely Loud by Jonathan Safran Foen
11 – High Fidelity (reread) by Nick Hornby
12 – The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

April
13 – The Greatest Game Ever Pitched by Jim Kaplan
14 – American Pastoral by Philip Roth
15 – Lord of the Flies by William Golding
16 – A Drink Before the War by Dennis Lehane
17 – A Prayer For Owen Meany by John Irving
18 – The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy
19 – Mystic River by Dennis Lehane
20 – Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging 70s by Dan Epstein
21 – The Postman Always Rings Twice by James Cain
22 – Zeitoun by Dave Eggers

May
23 – The Forged Coupon by Leo Tolstoy
24 – Committed by Elizabeth Gilbert
25 – The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
26 – A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery O’Connor
27 – The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (reread)
28 – Exit Ghost by Philip Roth
29 – Everyman by Philip Roth

June
30 – Rabbit Run by John Updike
31 – The Stranger by Albert Camus
32 – A Widow For One Year by John Irving
33 – Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding
34 – The Humbling by Philip Roth
35 – The Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac (reread)

July
36 – The Ghost Writer by Philip Roth
37 – Narcissus and Goldmund by Herman Hesse
38 – I Am America (And So Can You!) by Stephen Colbert
39 – Breakfast of Champions by Kurt Vonnegut
40 – Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt
41 – The Yiddish Policeman’s Union by Michael Chabon
42 – The Team That Changed Baseball by Bruce Markusen

August
43 – Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns Goodwin
44 – Operation Shylock: A Confession by Philip Roth
45 – Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow
46 – The Sea by John Banville
47 – Lie Down in Darkness by William Styron
48 – John Adams by David McCullough
49 – Salem’s Lot by Stephen King

September
50 – All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy
51 – Indignation by Philip Roth
52 – Firestarter by Stephen King
53 – Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King
54 – The Cider House Rules by John Irving
55 – The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America’s Childhood by Jane Leavy
56 – The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
57 – Prayers for Rain by Dennis Lehane

October
58 – The Untouchable by John Banville
59 – Nemesis by Philip Roth
60 – The Ghost Writer by Philip Roth (reread)
61 – On Chesil Beach by Ian McEwan
62 – The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich
63 – Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America by Barbara Ehrenreich
64 – Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (reread)
65 – Ham on Rye by Charles Bukowski
66 – Light in August by William Faulkner

November
67 – Zuckerman Unbound by Philip Roth
68 – The Anatomy Lesson by Philip Roth
69 – The Prague Orgy by Philip Roth
70 – The March by E.L. Doctorow
71 – Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut (reread)
72 – The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
73 – Berlin: The Downfall 1945 by Antony Beevor
74 – Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut

December
75 – The Last Icon: Tom Seaver and His Times by Steven Travers
76 – The Sex Lives of Cannibals by J. Maarten Troost
77 – I’m a Stranger Here Myself by Bill Bryson
78 – Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell
79 – Rabbit Redux by John Updike

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10 thoughts on “Jackson Bound

  1. If any of these are in the file you gave me, I’d love to know which to put on my list of “to reads”. I’d also like to know what you thought of Lord of the Flies 🙂

    • I actually didn’t care much for Lord of the Flies. It had been on my list for about a decade and once I finally got to it, I was disappointed. It wasn’t bad, it just wasn’t as good as I thought it’d be.

      As for recommendations from the Kindle file, for you Kylene, I’d go with A Prayer For Owen Meany. I’m thinking of rating the books I read soon to give you a better indication.

      • Thanks, Jeff. And I totally understand your opinion on Lord of the Flies. I really enjoy it because of all the insight I got while teaching to my students (themes, blah blah), but as a whole, it definitely wasn’t the best book ever.

        I’ll start A Prayer for Owen Meany this week. I’ve been on a reading lull (haven’t read in two weeks, yikes!) and needed something to get me started again. I’ll make this the one and let you know how I like it!

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  3. I see you’ve read “The girl With the Dragon Tattoo”, but not the 2 sequels. Did you like it? Many of us (my mom, Nancy, Kathy,…) have read all three and loved them. I recommend continuing the series. I am currently reading “The Hunger Games”. There is a third book in the series – I see you’ve read 2. Are you planning to contine with this?

    Patti

    • Patti, I loved The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and plan to read the next one once I’m in a mystery mood. I’m also planning on completing the Hunger Games trilogy once I’m in a young adult mood. I read the first two in the matter of a month or two and, although I loved them, got a bit burned out. I have two years. I’m sure I’ll get around to all of them. 🙂

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  6. Pingback: The literature that got me through the Year Two: Favorite books of 2012 | Sa-wat-dii From Thailand

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